For Kids, Divorce is Better Than Emotional Abuse

You know that the home life your children are enduring isn’t optimal. Your spouse is emotionally abusive to you and the kids.

You want to end the marriage. However, you’re always trying to put your kids first. You’re worried about the impact a divorce can have on them.

Experts note that divorce can be hard for kids. However, they also say that leaving them in an emotionally abusive situation can be even worse.

Kids who are threatened, manipulated and called names typically spend a lot of time worrying and struggling with low self-esteem. They have separation anxiety and may grow clingy. They may also be worried about failure, to the point that it’s crippling, as they try not to give your spouse any reason for the emotional abuse.

These issues can stay with them for the rest of their lives. While every situation is different, it’s important that you understand the risks. Divorce isn’t the only thing that is going to impact your kids.

One key to helping your kids after the split is to keep up an amicable relationship with your spouse. This may be hard, especially considering the reason you’re leaving the marriage. However, childhood development experts have found that parents who work to get along can often help make the transition go smoothly for the kids, limiting the impact it has on their lives. If you’re really putting them first, that should be the goal.

Remember that the children’s best interests need to come first throughout the entire process. Make sure that you understand and respect their needs and legal rights.

Source:¬†Our Everyday Life, “Emotionally Abusive Marriage vs. Divorce and the Effects on Children,” Anna Green, accessed Sep. 27, 2017