Some fathers in Hawaii who are going through a divorce might wonder whether they will be at a disadvantage in a child custody case. Traditionally, this was true since mothers often stayed home with their children while fathers went to work. As a result, when couples got divorced, it was assumed that the mother would be the best caregiver for the children.

Today, this is no longer the case. Fathers are more likely to be seen as equal parenting partners, and they might share custody with the mother or even get custody themselves. However, some courts may still be biased against fathers. They may assume that a father is not nurturing, does not know how to take care of children or lacks the proper time to take care of children.

To prepare themselves to potentially face this bias in the courtroom, fathers may want to hire an attorney. A father who wants joint custody should be prepared to demonstrate that he communicates well with the child’s mother. He should also show that he has a strong relationship with his child. A court will make a decision that is in the child’s best interests.

Not every divorce involving children means that the parents will end up in court. It is also possible to reach an agreement regarding child custody and visitation through negotiation. Parents may create a plan for child custody and visitation that best suits them and their children. Some parents even try an approach called “nesting,” which involves the children remaining in the family home while the parents rotate in and out. This can help children adjust to the divorce, but most parents find it is only a temporary solution and that a more traditional schedule for sharing custody or for custody and visitation works better.